The Bullshit

The Bullshit

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Discussions (3)

MEME

posted 3 years ago

Let the truth be told through a MEME

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Tell him Buzz...

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Zucker

  • 3 years ago

    Gil

    MEME'S!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nine Inch Nails

posted 3 years ago

Die Hard NIN fan created damn near every Live concert EVER!!!

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Just in time for the holidays, Reflecting in the Chrome has gone live with the best possible gift one could give a Nine Inch Nails fan: a downloadable audio archive of nearly every available NIN show since 1988. It’s taken the site’s founder, Ryan J., six years to compile, clean, and organize all the files, and he’s now made them all available as a free torrent (via Radio.com)

    All told, the drive contains 527 GB of music from 900 different audio sources and some 575 concerts. Ryan recommends a 750 GB hard-drive at minimum to store the entire archive and any future updates. He also warns that seeding the file will be a slow process until more seeders make themselves available. For those ...

  • 3 years ago

    Gil

    This is dedication.

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    HAHAHA

December 19th 2014

posted 3 years ago

The music industry consists of the companies and individuals that make money by creating and selling music. Among the many individuals and organizations that operate within the industry are: the musicians who compose and perform the music; the companies and professionals who create and sell recorded music (e.g., music publishers, producers, recording studios, engineers, record labels, retail and online music stores, performance rights organizations); those that present live music performances (booking agents, promoters, music venues, road crew); professionals who assist musicians with their music careers (talent managers, business managers, entertainment lawyers); those who broadcast music (satellite, internet and broadcast radio); journalists; educators; musical instrument manufacturers; as well as many others. The current music industry emerged around the middle of the 20th century, when records had supplanted sheet music as the largest player in the music business: in the commercial world, people began speaking of "the recording industry" as a loose synonym of "the music industry". Along with their numerous subsidiaries, a large majority of this market for recorded music is controlled by three major corporate labels: the French-owned Universal Music Group, the Japanese-owned Sony Music Entertainment,[1] and the US-owned Warner Music Group. Labels outside of these three major labels are referred to as independent labels. The largest portion of the live music market is controlled by Live Nation, the largest promoter and music venue owner. Live Nation is a former subsidiary of Clear Channel Communications, which is the largest owner of radio stations in the United States. Creative Artists Agency is a large talent management and booking company. The music industry has been undergoing drastic changes since the advent of widespread digital distribution of music. A conspicuous indicator of this is total music sales: since 2000, sales of recorded music have dropped off substantially[2][3] while live music has increased in importance.[4] The largest music retailer in the world is now digital: Apple Inc.'s iTunes Store.[5] The two largest companies in the industry are Universal Music Group (recording) and Sony/ATV Music Publishing (publisher). Universal Music Group, Sony BMG, EMI Group (now a part of Universal Music Group (recording) and Sony/ATV Music Publishing (publisher)) and Warner Music Group were collectively known as the "Big Four" majors. Labels outside of the Big Four were referred to as independent labels. S: Does anyone think that THE MUSIC INDUSTRY is in a good place right now?

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Does anyone think the MUSIC INDUSTRY is in a good place right now?

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Here is a breakdown.

  • 3 years ago

    Guest

    Want to know how much a musician really makes from digital services like iTunes, Spotify and YouTube? Zoë Keating is one of the more reliable sources.

    The cellist, who self-releases her music rather than work with a label, has made a habit of sharing details of how her earnings break down between different sources, for the benefit of her peers and the wider debate around digital music payouts.

    Over the weekend, Keating published her latest set of figures as a public document on Google Drive, splitting her recorded-music earnings from 2013 into sales and streams. In short, 92% of her income last year came from sales – $75,341 – with a further $6,380 coming from streaming services. ...

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